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Monday, 20 January 2014

Horncastle (Part 1 of 4)

Horncastle is a market town in the Lincolnshire Wolds, situated on the River Bain.

Horncastle was given its market charter in the 13th century. It was formerly known for its great August Horse Fair — an internationally-famous annual trading event which lasted until the early 20th century. The town is now known as a centre for the antiques trade.
The great annual horse fair probably first took place in the 13th century. The fair used to last for a week or more every August, and in the 19th century was probably the largest event of its kind in the United Kingdom. "Horncastle for horses" made the town famous – the fair was used as a setting for George Borrow's semi-autobiographical books Lavengro and The Romany Rye – but the last fair was held in 1948.

(The above paragraph courtesy of Wikipedia)


I haven't seen this before, a slot machine that dispenses a map of the town.

The River Bain runs through, Horncastle.

Looking from the car park bridge down the River Bain to the old mill.

This is the old mill,. no longer in use.


Horncastle is known for it's antique shops and I also noticed it has quite a few book shops too.

The old Co-op building is now an antiques centre.


Looking down the alleyway at the side of the old Co_op antiques centre I noticed these
items left at the entrance and wondered what might be at the other end. 

A VERY large yard was crammed full of crockery for sale.  There was so much on display
that I'm sure it must be left out all the time.


This might give some idea of the scale of the display.

The view as we were leaving.

These items were obviously left out to tempt people up the alleyway.

Back in the main street was Kemp & Son, a traditional ironmongers shop.

They sold all manner of things and another time I might ask if
I can explore things a bit more.

Everything you might need for your pet.

Not sure what this building was or has been.  It was empty but the sign said office spaces.

A nice snack shop.

(Part 2 will follow)

All pictures taken with a Panasonic G5 camera.